Two More Bald Eagles Admitted

Two Bald Eagles Admitted With Lead Poisoning, One Bald Eagle Hit by a Vehicle

Just admitted a juvenile Bald Eagle from Juneau County. He was hit by a vehicle. He was eating on a carcass near the road when he was hit. 
Thank you to Sarah for rescuing him and bringing him to our transporter. Thank you REGI transporter Jeff Konopacky for transporting him to us. I love it when people come together to help wildlife. 
We admitted an adult Bald Eagle from Gleason. He was noticed on the ground by alert land owners. REGI volunteers Kevin and Linda Grenzer rescued the eagle and transported him to REGI for care. He has lead poisoning. 
We admitted an adult Bald Eagle from Hayward. He was rescued by DNR personal and transported to REGI by Steve and Evie Fisher. He has lead poisoning, and an additional toxin as well that we have not yet identified. He is in critical condition.

It seems every time we post that we have admitted lead poisoned Bald Eagles there are folks that do not yet understand where the lead is coming from or how the eagles make contact with it. I am including several links below that may be helpful to explain. We are not the only wildlife center that is seeing this problem. Every center that works with eagles is seeing exactly the same thing we are. We continue to do education to increase awareness of lead poisoning.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/24/us/ammunition-lead-bullets-condors.html?fb=1&recb=published-assets-bq.thompson_sampling&recid=1EPXBYrFbiPdN0YXTiyGnu1YEUx&mi_u=65047577&fbclid=IwAR3i1OXs1fUITE8FIomkW7b9kZV9qdh-vYm1i7DGidc0GCMYa-JHbYRSqT0

https://www.nytimes.com/…/the-toxic-legacy-of-lead-paint.ht…

http://www.huntingwithnonlead.org/

https://www.cabelas.com/…/Non-Toxic-Shot-Buyers-…/532009.uts