Domestic Rescues

I rarely write about our domestic rescues, yet in this past few weeks you have met some of our domestics on our Facebook Page. We do not do this often, but frankly it is hard to turn down animals where abuse or neglect has played a role even when it was unintentional. Nine days ago we rescued two domestic ducks. Let me add here that it is easy to blame the folks that had the ducks.  That is not always fair. Baby ducks, chickens and other domestics, including parrots, are easily obtainable and do not come with instructions. They are adorable. The problem is that babies of all kinds, including our own, need special food high in calcium and minerals to accommodate their rapid bone growth and development. Those products are more expensive as is proper caging for little ones as they grow.

The ducks when they were at their previous home.

The ducks when they were at their previous home.


Above are some photos of the two, three month old ducks we rescued twelve days ago. They have rickets or hypocalcaemia. The simply means they did not have a diet rich in calcium, vitamin D or other important minerals to grow strong bones, body and even internal organs.
Our ducks are doing as well as can be expected. They are growing feathers, eating very well and gaining needed weight. They are beginning to walk, although their leg deformities will always be with them. Everyday they are able to lounge on grass in the sun. This is something they never knew. They are very bonded to each other and sleep with their necks around each other.
Below you can see that life is getting better. They still have a long way to go, but they will have a future.
Now we will go back to our wild bird work.

raptor education group, inc. domestic ducks cleaned up