Springtime at REGI

The weather may not agree, but the calendar tells us spring has arrived; many of our migrant birds agree and have made the journey back to Wisconsin.  Among the first were Red-winged Blackbirds, robins, geese, and swans; kestrels, woodcocks, Turkey Vultures, and bluebirds have also been spotted in the area bringing hopes of warmer weather.  Unfortunately, we’re also seeing some of these migrants come into our clinic.  

An American Woodcock resting after being hit by a car.

An American Woodcock resting after being hit by a car.

 

The American Woodcock has this very long bill to probe in the soil for earthworms and other invertebrates.  This one was likely searching for worms on the side of the road after a snowstorm where he was hit by a car.  Our own staff, Emily Kermath, found him on the way to work.  He is currently in critical condition.

This goose was seen hit by a car and was rescued and brought to REGI.  Though no broken bones, she has soft tissue damage to her right wing.  

This goose was seen hit by a car and was rescued and brought to REGI.  Though no broken bones, she has soft tissue damage to her right wing.  

 

This Canada Goose was walking across the street with others when she was hit by a car in Rib Mountain.  A member of the public who saw the incident told the staff at the DNR station, who  went and rescued her.  She was then brought in by one of our great transport volunteers, Dawn Stein.  She was also in very critical condition when she came, but she luckily did not suffer any broken bones.  She is now much more active and healing from her injuries well.  Our thanks to Dawn and the DNR staff!  

 

American Kestrels are one of the few raptors you can distinguish male or female based on color.  Here the male shows his slate blue/gray wings where as females continue the brown.  He suffered an injury to his right wing and is resting comfortably here after admission.

American Kestrels are one of the few raptors you can distinguish male or female based on color.  Here the male shows his slate blue/gray wings where as females continue the brown.  He suffered an injury to his right wing and is resting comfortably here after admission.

 

This American Kestrel was found in the woods near Lakewood, WI by members of the public.  We aren’t sure what happened to this guy, but he does have an injury to his right wing and was skinny upon arrival.  He is now comfortable in our clinic with his wing wrapped for proper healing.  He continues to get stronger and gain weight.  


Soon the warmer weather will return and our patient load will continue to grow.  For now, we have started our spring cleaning and are trying our best to prepare for the busy summer months ahead...