Bald Eagle suffering from lead poisoning, starvation, and a head injury

An adult Bald Eagle from Necedah, WI suffering from lead poisoning, starvation and a head injury. (photo by Mary and Robert Lee)

An adult Bald Eagle from Necedah, WI suffering from lead poisoning, starvation and a head injury. (photo by Mary and Robert Lee)

On February 17th, 2016, we admitted an adult male Bald Eagle from Necedah, WI. He was in very critical condition suffering from several things including starvation and lead poisoning. He has breathing issues as well. We have started antibiotics and have given his first treatment of CaEDTA for lead poisoning. He is resting comfortably and we are doing our best. Our thanks to Robert and Mary Lee and Cubby and Emily Taylor that found the eagle, stopped and got him help. Cubby and Emily then transported him to Raptor Education Group, Inc. in Antigo, a 2 hr. drive each way from where the eagle was found. (Photo credit to Mary Lee for the photos of the eagle when he was found)

For the many that have asked...Lead poisoning this time of the year usually comes from the bird eating from a discarded or animal that was shot with lead ammunition and was either placed in the woods for predators to eat...or died in the woods of its injury. Often those that want to "feed" eagles etc. with carcasses have no idea that they contain lead or how lethal it is. Lead is a soft metal and fragments upon entering an animal’s body. The tiny fragments are toxic. Lead the size of a grain of sand cause lead poisoning in a human child. You can see how toxic it is. We hope all hunters make the switch to copper jacketed bullets when hunting. It is safer for wildlife, not to mention their own family. Pregnant women and children are the most affected. Lead poisoning causes mental retardation as well as a host of medical problems and death.

Weak but now warm and comfortable the eagle is safe and can begin recovery.  Thank you to Cubby and Emily Taylor for transporting him the 4 hours round trip to REGI. We so appreciate your help.

Weak but now warm and comfortable the eagle is safe and can begin recovery.  Thank you to Cubby and Emily Taylor for transporting him the 4 hours round trip to REGI. We so appreciate your help.